The Big Bad Woof Best of DC 2019

(202) 747-3434Woof Delivers

0Item(s)

You have no items in your shopping cart.

Product was successfully added to your shopping cart.

Caring for Community Cats

While the bulk of our business is for companion animals, we have many of our customers who care for Community Cats throughout the year, and as the seasons change, it is a reminder to start thinking about shelter and food as the winter starts to sneak up on us.
 
Cat inside outdoor shelterOutdoor kitties need shelter to weather the cold, even though their winter coats are thickened. Their are a number of good plans online to build your own, and we offer a number of weatherproof habitats with and without radiant heating pads if you would like a ready-made shelter.
 
A shelter must trap the cats' body heat to warm its interior. If the shelter is too large, it will be difficult for the cats' body heat to keep the space warm. Straw can also be added to allow the cat to burrow.
 
Don't use blankets, towels or folded newspaper; they absorb body heat and chill cats who are lying on them. Forego hay, too, which may irritate noses and cause allergic reactions.
 
What you put food and water in can make a difference. A thick plastic water container that's deep and wide is better-insulated than a thin plastic or ceramic container. Do not put water inside, as it can be spilled easily.

If shelters are well-insulated, you can put bowls of dry or moist food inside them, far from the doorway. Even if the moist food freezes, the cats' body heat will defrost it when they hunker down in their shelter.

If you are going to trap the cats for a spay-neuter, be sure that you are returning the cats to adequate shelter so that they can recover well post-surgery.

 
Other questions about caring for Community Cats? Come see us at the Woof, we’ll be glad to help.
 
 

They may be pets whose owners let them outside, or they could be community cats, a group that includes ferals (who are afraid of people) and strays (who've been lost or abandoned).